MIT PORT MAPPER

Welcome to the MIT Port Mapper beta site. The Port Mapper was designed to identify domestic US ports that could possibly absorb cargo in the event of a disruption at a port. However, are there other ways that this tool could be useful? The research team has posted the Port Mapper tool online to gather input from users on how we might possibly further develop the tool.

Application Overview

At present, the application is set up to plot and link ports based on the commodities that they handle. The user makes two selections:
- Choice of state or choice of SIC Group/SIC Family or SIC Description
- Choice of all ports or top ten ports, or a specific port by name (note that once you select a specific SIC type, only those ports that handle that SIC will be displayed)

Once the selections are made, the user must click MAP PORTS to display the results. The results will plot and link the ports handling the SIC from either the specific port selected or the largest port handling that commodity if All Ports or Top 10 Ports was selected.

The user must CLEAR MAP for each analysis. If the application gets hung up, the user should refresh the page.

The user is invited to provide additional comments by clicking on Additional Comments and this will bring the user back to this page.

A few examples

If you were interested in knowing which ports in the US handle Radioactive Materials, on the top input line you would select Chemicals - 3281 Radioactive Material, and then on the bottom input line you would select All under Ports to View (on the left side of the screen). If you were interested in seeing the top 10 ports handling radioactive materials, you would choose the same for the top line but select Top 10 under Ports to View, then click Map Port.

If you were interested in knowing the Top 10 ports that could handle containers if the Port of Savannah were closed, you would select Container under SIC Group; on the second input line you would select Top 10 under Ports to View and then also select Port of Savannah in the drop down menu next to Port to Fail, then click on Map Port.

Remember that you must Clear Map after each analysis. Also note that all ports are listed in order of volume, so the first port listed will always be the largest one handling that particular SIC.

How to get started

Please provide your initial thoughts on how this tool may be useful in the boxes below. We are interested in your impressions before you use the tool, and then again after you use the tool. Once you provide your input below, click on Submit Comments... and you will be redirected to the application page.

 

How could this application help you?
(Required)
What would you like to see this application do? (Required)
Name: (Required)
Email: (Required)
 



Project Reference

This work was conducted by the MIT Port Resilience research team (Jim Rice, Kai Trepte) at MIT Center for Transportation and Logistics with assistance from Matt Mattingley. This work is funded by the US DHS Center of Excellence Center for Secure and Resilient Maritime Commerce. The initial concept was to aid in estimating the capacity required to absorb the failure of ports within the United States. The data for the study comes from the Army Corps of Engineers which summarizes the detailed manifests by commodity, port and year. Please contact the researchers for additional information.

As noted above, at present the application is set up to demonstrate that ports can be plotted and linked based on the commodities that they handle. We hope that you will take a few moments to provide us with feedback on where we should take the application next. As an example, we could perform additional research to gather data regarding the characteristics of each port such as channel depth, handling equipment or other feature.


Contact: Jim Rice - 617.258.8584 - jrice@mit.edu
Contact: Kai Trepte - 312.560.9098 - trepte@mit.edu


As noted above, at present the application is set up to demonstrate that ports can be plotted and linked based on the commodities that they handle. We hope that you will take a few moments to provide us with feedback on where we should take the application next. As an example, we could perform additional research to gather data regarding the characteristics of each port such as channel depth, handling equipment or other feature.